Press Releases

Eating home or away: effects on BMI and dietary intake

A study, conducted by Ilana Nogueira Bezerra and colleagues at the University of Fortaleza and the University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and published in Public Health Nutrition, demonstrated that there was no significant difference between non-consumers and consumers of away-from-home food (AFHF) in prevalence of overweight and obesity among men. Among women, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was lower in consumers compared with non-consumers of food away from home.

For further information, please read the full press release.

This paper is freely available for until 11 July 2014 via the Publisher's website.

  • Date: 13 June 2014

Poor breakfast in youth linked to metabolic syndrome in adulthood

It is often said that breakfast is important for our health and a study conducted by Umeå University, published in Public Health Nutrition supports this claim.
The study revealed that adolescents who ate poor breakfasts displayed a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome 27 years later, compared with those who ate more substantial breakfasts.

For further information, please read the full press release.

This paper is freely available for 2 weeks via the Publisher's website.

For more information, please contact Maria Wennberg.
Telephone: +46 (0)70-4953230

  • Date: 28 January 2014

Pupils choose grab-and-go foods at schools

New research from nutrition experts from the University of Sheffield has revealed that sandwiches, pizza and puddings are the most popular dishes with pupils.

The pioneering study, published in Public Health Nutrition, discovered that despite secondary schools offering a number of freshly prepared hot meal options pupils are disregarding these in favour of foods such as sandwiches and pizza.

For further information please read the full press release.

This paper is freely available for a limited period via the Publisher's website

  • Date: 11 November

Equality in national initiatives in salt reduction programmes needed, say authors

A new review published in Public Health Nutrition links salt intake reduction policies across EU member states to the socio-economic status of those countries and their citizens.
The study found that countries with no national salt reduction initiatives had lower levels of inequality-adjusted human development. A lack of coordinated efforts to address this disparity could lead to widening social and health inequalities.

For further information please read the full press release.

This paper is freely available for a limited period via the Publisher's website

  • Date: 19 August 2013

People who understand multiple causes of obesity more likely to support government anti-obesity policies

People who believe being overweight is caused by the food environment or genes – both seen as outside individual control - are more likely to support a wide range of government policies to tackle the obesity epidemic, new research shows.

The study published in Public Health Nutrition, concluded that improving awareness of the multiple causes of obesity could help the public to accept government action to reduce obesity.

For further information please read the full press release.

This paper is freely available for a limited period via the Publisher's website

  • Date: 25 July 2013

Changes needed to hit free school meal targets, study reveals

Quality and size portions, rather than stigma, are the main reasons that pupils are not taking up their free school meals, according to new research by Leeds Metropolitan University, published this week in the journal Public Health Nutrition.

In England, children from low income families in receipt of state benefits are entitled to receive free school meals. Previous research highlights that pupils receiving free school meals obtain a higher proportion of their daily energy and nutrient intake from their meal compared with those who pay. But, of the 1.5 million families entitled, only 1.2 million register and only 1 million children actually consume their free meal. The study set out to discover why.

For further information please read the full press release.

This paper is freely available for a limited period via the Publisher's website

  • Date: 16 April 2013 

A new easy way to diagnose obesity in childhood

Between 2007 and 2008, EPINUT Research Group from Complutense University of Madrid (Spain) conducted a study of 2319 Spanish schoolchildren between 6 and 14 years. The results, published in Public Health Nutrition, showed significant differences in the waist-to-height ratio (WtHR) among children classified as undernourished, normally nourished, overweight and obese. Based on these results, researchers developed equations to estimate body fat percentage in both sexes from WtHR.

For further information about this study please read the full press release.

The paper is freely available for a limited period on the Publisher's website.

  • Date: 4 April 2013 

Integrating Exercise into a curriculum can modify unhealthy eating behaviour and reduce sedentary lifestyle in school Children

In a study published in Public Health Nutrition, researchers from the Minas Gerais State Secretariat for Health – Brazil demonstrated the effectiveness of a Brazilian version of the American program ‘TAKE 10!®’ to promote willingness in 6-12 year old schoolchildren to engage in healthy lifestyle related to eating habits and physical activity behaviours. They compared the Brazilian version, called ‘TIRE 10!’ with ‘Agita Galera’, a program designed with the same purpose and recommended by the WHO for developing countries and Brazilian Ministry of Health.

Overweight and obesity has dramatically increased all over the world, including Brazil. The increase in childhood excess body weight has been attributed to behavioural factors that cause a long-term imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Therefore, behavioural problems require behavioural solutions and excess body weight prevention through targeted behavioural change has become a public health priority.

For further information please read the full press release.

This paper is freely available for a limited period via the Publisher's website

  • Date: 27 February 2013

Study shows kids influenced by sport sponsor ads for alcohol, fast food

The impact on children of alcohol and fast-food advertising in sports sponsorship is concerning health experts at The University of Western Australia. They have demonstrated for the first time that children are likely to be subconsciously absorbing multi-million dollar sports sponsorship messages.

Professor Simone Pettigrew was a co-author of a paper on the topic which was published recently in the journal Public Health Nutrition.

With her UWA colleagues she designed a study to capture the effects of the likely substantial subconscious effects of alcohol and fast-food manufacturers’ efforts to associate their products with healthy sport via sponsorship.

For further information please read the full press release.

The full paper is available to free for a limited time on the Publisher's website

  • Date: 6 February 2013 

Foods Identified as ‘Whole Grain’ Not Always Healthy
New Standard Needed to Help Consumers, Organizations Choose Foods Rich in Whole Grains

Current standards for classifying foods as “whole grain” are inconsistent and, in some cases, misleading, according to a new study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. One of the most widely used industry standards, the Whole Grain Stamp, actually identified grain products that were higher in both sugars and calories than products without the Stamp. The researchers urge adoption of a consistent, evidence-based standard for labeling whole grain foods to help consumers and organizations make healthy choices. This is the first study to empirically evaluate the healthfulness of whole grain foods based on five commonly used industry and government definitions.

The study appears in the 4 January 2013 advanced online edition of Public Health Nutrition

For further information please read the full press release.

To view this paper please visit the Publisher's website.

  • Date: 14 January 2013 

New Poll Shows U.S. Public Supports Continued Investment in Federal Nutrition Assistance Program

Respondents Support Incentivizing Purchase of Healthy Foods, Restricting Purchase of Sugary Drinks

A new poll from researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) shows that the U.S. public broadly supports increasing or maintaining spending on the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as the Food Stamp Program. The majority of Americans, including a majority of SNAP participants, also supported policies to improve the nutritional impact of SNAP by incentivizing the purchase of healthy foods and restricting the purchase of sugary drinks.

Congress is expected to debate changes, including potential cuts, to SNAP and other components of federal nutrition policy in the coming months as part of the stalled 2012 Farm Bill.

“This study provides decision-makers with a clear statement of public support for continued federal investment in preventing hunger and severe poverty through the SNAP program,” said lead author Michael Long, a doctoral candidate at HSPH.

The poll analysis appears on 5 December 2012 in an advance online edition of Public Health Nutrition

For further information please read the full press release.

To view this paper please visit the Publisher's website.

  • Date: 6 December 2012

New study reveals more inspiring reasons to serve veggies at dinner

Parsippany, NJ (November 14, 2012) – Parents may have some new motivations to serve their kids vegetables. A new study, funded in part by Pinnacle Foods' Birds Eye brand and published in Public Health Nutrition, found that adding vegetables to the plate led to more positive evaluations of both the main entrée and the cook. By simply serving vegetables with dinner, participants believed the main course would taste better and thought the server was more thoughtful and attentive.

"Most parents know that vegetables are healthy, yet vegetables are served at only 23% of American dinners," said lead author Brian Wansink, PhD, the John Dyson Professor of Marketing and Consumer Behavior at Cornell University. "That means we need to find some new motivations to encourage parents to make vegetables a bigger part of the meal. If parents knew that adding vegetables to the plate could make what they prepare for dinner seem more appealing, or could increase their own "heroic" appeal, then maybe they'd be more inspired to serve vegetables."

For further information please read the full press release.

AUTHOR'S VIDEO

To view the paper please visit the Publisher's website.

  • Date: 20 November 2012 

Longer life for those who follow nutritional guidelines

Those who follow the nutritional guidelines issued by Sweden’s National Food Agency live longer. This is shown by a new study of the diets of 17 000 Swedish men and women over a long period of time. The greatest effect was observed in men, whose risk of dying of cardiovascular disease was almost halved.

The researchers behind the results, which were recently published in the journal Public Health Nutrition, are Isabel Drake and Elisabet Wirfält from Lund University, Sweden.

For further information, please read the full press release.

To view this paper please visit the Publisher's website.

  • Date: 18 June 2012

Frequent cooking will help you live longer

A new study published In Public Health Nutrition links frequent cooking to a longer life.

In advanced economies, households generally cook less than half of their meals leading to an increased concern among nutrition policy makers that fewer meals are being cooked at home.

Reasons for this are varied and include lack of skills and confidence, little access to basic food commodities, cooking facilities and the availability of commercial alternatives.

For further information please read the full press release.

This paper will be available to view on the Publisher's website for a limited time.

  • Date: Tuesday 15 May 2012

Food guidelines for pregnant women need review

A University of Newcastle study has identified a major diet dilemma for pregnant women and those trying to conceive – avoiding potentially ‘risky’ foods while maintaining an adequate nutrient intake.

The study of more than 7,000 Australian women, published in Public Health Nutrition, is the first to examine the nutrient intakes of pregnant women who adhered to the recommended Listeria guidelines.

For further information please read the full press release.

This paper will be free to view on the Publisher's website until the end of April 2012.

  • Date: Thursday 15 March 2012