Paper of the month

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Paper of the month’ is a monthly feature, whereby a recently accepted paper from a Society journal, published on Cambridge Journals Online is made freely available for a limited period. Each paper is accompanied by a blog from the author and comments and discussion are welcome.

To view past papers selected as 'Paper of the month' please see the archive. Please note only papers over a year old will be freely available without subscription.


  • APRIL 2014

This month’s featured paper is from the Journal of Nutritional Science and is entitled 'What happens to food choices when a gluten-free diet is required? A prospective longitudinal population-based study among Swedish adolescent with coeliac disease and their peers.

The author’s studied how a diagnosis of Coeliac Disease (CD) affected food intake among Swedish adolescents, who were diagnosed with CD during the study period. The results showed that the screening-detected adolescents reported a reduced intake of many flour-based foods such as pizza, fish fingers and pastries. Apart from bread intake, the screening-detected group reported at baseline, a very similar food intake to the non-coeliac control group but at follow-up, the screening-detected group reported an intake much more similar to the symptom-detected group than to the non-coeliac control group.
The authors also noted that specially manufactured Gluten Free products (e.g. pasta and bread) were frequently used in the screening-detected CD group after changing to a Gluten Free diet.

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  • MARCH 2014

This month’s featured paper is from Proceedings of the Nutrition Society and is entitled ‘The way to a man’s heart is through his gut microbiota’ – dietary pro- and prebiotics for the management of cardiovascular risk'

This review paper aimed to summarise recent insights connecting human gut microbiome activities with CVD and how such activities may be modulated by diet.

The author has written a blog on this paper and further comments are welcomed. To view the blog and access the full paper online, please follow the link provided below.

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  •  FEBRUARY 2014

This month’s featured paper is from British Journal of Nutrition and is entitled ‘Iodine deficiency in pregnant women living in the South East of the UK: the influence of diet and nutritional supplements on iodine status’.

The study measured the iodine status of pregnant women from the Royal Surrey County Hospital, at 12 weeks’ gestation. The results showed that according to WHO criteria, the women were classified as mildly-to-moderately iodine deficient. Furthermore, the estimated 24-hr iodine excretion value was much lower than would have been expected if women had been meeting the WHO requirements. This, together with studies showing iodine deficiency in pregnant women in other regions of the UK, raises concern for the brain development of UK babies. The authors conclude that “This research needs to be repeated in other areas of the UK; a national survey of iodine status in pregnancy is needed to establish the full magnitude and spread of iodine deficiency in UK pregnant women.”

The author has written a blog on this paper and further comments are welcomed. To view the blog and access the full paper online, please follow the link provided below. 

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  • JANUARY 2014

This month's featured paper is from Public Health Nutrition and is entitled 'Implications of inconsistent anaemia policies for children and adolescents in Africa'.

Evidence-based policies are essential in order to reduce anaemia, but as it results from interdependent factors there are difficulties in the development of cohesive policies for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Nutritional requirements are also derived from food intake studies in healthy Western children and may not always be appropriate in a developing country situation.

This paper evaluated the quality of these policies and the extent to which they were based on evidence relevant to the African context. Recommendations are made for improving the policy-making process.

The author has written a blog on this paper and further comments are welcomed. To view the blog and access the full paper online, please follow the link provided below. 

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