Press Releases

New research study exploring the benefit of probiotic in people with spinal injury

Researchers at the National Spinal Injuries Centre (NSIC) in Stoke Mandeville Hospital, a research partner of the Centre of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition at University College London, have found that a daily commercial probiotic drink (containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota: Yakult Light) significantly reduces incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in spinal injury patients.
The study, published today in the peer-reviewed British Journal of Nutrition, was funded by the Healthcare Infection Society and by Yakult UK Limited, who also provided the Yakult Light drinks.

Spinal injury patients are very prone to diarrhoea when on antibiotics. Antibiotics can disturb the ecosystem of micro-organisms normally present in the digestive system, allowing bacteria such as Clostridium difficile to overwhelm the gut.

For further information on this study please download the full press release.

The full paper is available on the publisher's website for a limited period.

  • Date: 25 Septmeber 2013 

Brain imaging to show how diet affects our brain

What we eat, or do not eat, may have an important impact on our cognitive ability and mental performance. Changes in brain functions can be long-term events difficult to demonstrate by traditional means. Brain imaging offers the critical opportunity to study how nutrition affects brain functions. In a review published today in the British Journal of Nutrition, an ILSI Europe expert group explained how to use 8 types of brain imaging techniques for the detection of nutrient impacts on brain structure and function, during lifespan but especially during development and decline.

The brain is the most complex organ in the human body. It contains approximately 100 billion neurons, each connected by synapses to several thousand other neurons. The brain is a highly active organ that utilises a large proportion of total nutrient and energy throughout the lifespan. Furthermore, the development and repair of neural tissue depends on the proper intake of essential nutrients, minerals and vitamins. Despite great progress in understanding the relations between brain function and nutrition, research is hindered by practical feasibility or methodological constraints.

For further information on this study please download the full press release.

The full paper is available on the publisher's website for a limited period.

  • Date: 02 August 2013 

Evaluating how nutrition can optimize immune function

An optimal immune system is crucial to human health. After vaccination, nutrition is one of the major factors which modulates immune function. Currently, there is uncertainty within the scientific community regarding what markers are available to reliably measure the impact of diet on the different aspects of immune function. In an article published today in the British Journal of Nutrition, ILSI Europe’s experts evaluated and prioritised more than 75 key immune markers.

Food-based solutions to optimize immune function are much sought after by consumers. Whole diets, individual nutrients and food components such as phytochemicals, prebiotics and probiotics have all been shown to affect various aspects of the immune system. In the context of the European Commission nutrition and health claims regulation, the substantiation of ingredient/food claims on immune functions requires reliable markers and rational approaches to interpret changes in such markers.

For further information on this study please download the full press release.

The full paper is available on the publisher's website for a limited period.

  • Date: 02 August 2013

Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and Newborn infants
Pregnant women, in Germany, are not sufficiently supplied with Vitamin D - and not just in winter.

This is the result of a study, published in British Journal of Nutrition, by Prof. Clemens Kunz and his research group at the Institute of Nutritional Science, Justus-Liebig University Giessen (JLU); together with Dr. Peter Gilbert and his team from the St. Josefsph Hospital Giessen Hospital. The research, carried out on 261 pregnant women and 328 newborns, showed that during the winter months 98 percent of the pregnant women had a Vitamin D status lower than that recommended by the German Nutrition Society (DGE). However, in the summer months when Vitamin D can be formed by sunlight on the skin, the levels were often still too low.

For further information on this study please download the full Press Release.

This paper is freely available online for 2 weeks after publication. Please visit the Publisher's website to access the full paper.

  • Date: 28 May 2013 

Beat fat faster before breakfast
People can burn up to 20% more body fat by exercising in the morning on an empty stomach, according to new research from Northumbria University.

In a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, academics sought to find out whether the known benefits of exercising after an overnight fast were undermined by an increased appetite and eating more food later in the day.

Researchers, led by Dr Emma Stevenson and PhD student Javier Gonzalez, asked twelve physically active male participants to perform a bout of treadmill exercise at 10am, either after they had eaten breakfast or in a fasted state having not eaten since the evening before.

The researchers discovered that those who had exercised in the morning did not consume additional calories or experience increased appetite during the day to compensate for their earlier activity.

They also found that those who had exercised in a fasted state burned almost 20% more fat compared to those who had consumed breakfast before their physical activity. This means that performing exercise on an empty stomach provides the most desirable outcome for fat loss.

For further information please download the full Press Release.

To view the full article online please visit the Publisher's website. The papers are freely available online for a limited period.

  • Date: 29 January 2013

National study: Older adults who are frail much more likely to be food insufficient

A national study of older Americans shows those who have limited mobility and low physical activity – scientifically categorized as “frail” – are five times more likely to report that they often don’t have enough to eat, defined as “food insufficiency,” than older adults who were not frail.

The nationally representative study of more than 4,700 adults older than age 60 in the United States uses data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The results are published online in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Lead author Ellen Smit, an epidemiologist at Oregon State University, said food insufficiency occurs when people report that they sometimes or often do not have enough food to eat. Food-insufficient older adults have been shown to have poor dietary intake, nutritional status and health status.

For further information please download the full Press Release.

To view the full article online please visit the Publisher's website. The papers are freely available online for a limited period.


Exercise more beneficial on an empty stomach, research shows

A new research paper from the University of Glasgow and published in British Journal of Nutrition, shows that it is better for your metabolic health to exercise first thing in the morning before breakfast.

We know that an early morning walk is good for you, but is it better for you to do your walk before or after your breakfast? Jason Gill and Nor Farah of the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences conducted a study to compare the effects of exercise performed before and after breakfast and look the effects on fat loss and metabolic health.

For further information please download the full Press Release.

To view the full article online please visit the Publisher's website. The papers are freely available online for a limited period.

  • Date: 1 November 2012 

Should we tax Soft Drinks?

Jack Winkler’s commentary on a report by Ng et al., challenges the proposal of a 10% tax on ‘sugar-sweetened beverages’ (SSB). Both articles appear in the current issue of British Journal of Nutrition and raise important questions about soft drink taxation and consumption.

In their report,  ‘Patterns and trends of beverage consumption among children and adults in Great Britain, 1986–2009’, the authors Ng, Ni Mhurchu, Jebb and Popkin conclude that a 10 % increase in the price of SSB could potentially result in a decrease of 7.5 ml/capita per d. Their analysis implies that taxation or other methods of shifting relative costs of these beverages could be a way to improve beverage choices in Great Britain.

For further information please download the full Press Release.

To view the complete paper online please visit the Publisher's website. The papers are freely available online for a limited period.

  • Date: 15 August 2012

Collaborative research team identifies safe upper level for vitamin A consumption for puppies 

A collaborative team of researchers, working on behalf of the European Pet Food Industry Federation (FEDIAF), has identified a safe upper level for vitamin A consumption for puppies. The research marks a significant step forward in the development of science-based recommendations for vitamin A levels for puppies and sheds new light on their distinct nutritional needs.

This research was conducted by scientists from the Free University of Berlin (Germany), the University of Potsdam (Germany), and the WALTHAM® Centre for Pet Nutrition (UK) and the research has been published in the British Journal of Nutrition and is available online

For further information please download the full Press Release.

To view the complete paper online please visit the Publisher's website.

  • Date: 9 May 2012

Linking Animal and Human Health: Researchers at NSAC Unravel Molecular Mechanisms of Fatty Liver Disease in Mink

Researchers at (Nova Scotia Agricultural College) NSAC have discovered new pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to the progression of fatty liver disease in mink, a strict carnivore. They report the first evidence for de novo lipid synthesis in mink with fatty liver based on the elevated gene expression of key enzymes of the fat synthesis pathway and the associated fatty acids. These findings demonstrate the rapidity and severity of the development of fatty liver during body weight loss. Results of this research are reported in the British Journal of Nutrition.

For further information please read the full press release.

  • Date: Thursday 12 January 2012